News

AGM 2019 - Glyndŵr Deliberations

01-April-2019

Our members congregated at Wrexham Glyndŵr University on 23 March 2019 for our annual conference and Annual General Meeting (AGM), starting with a pair of interactive workshops.

Firstly, Cilla Ross of The Co-operative College alerted people to exciting developments in creating a Co-operative University. Part of the Centenary Commission marking the anniversary of a ground-breaking 1919 report into adult education, she explained the public campaign promoting it, and participants answered the 12 questions which the Commission is focussed upon. The second workshop looked more at our own navel, as those present made proposals on how best to use monies from our members and supporters already in the organisation’s coffers, and how we should seek future donations and legacies.

With Wrexham AM Lesley Griffiths present, the Margaret Jones award for 2019 was then presented to Phil Beacall of Denbighshire. This annual award, which recognises an individual who has overcome barriers to succeed while learning with us, noted Phil’s progress in various Photography courses with support in adapting to the fact that he has cerebral palsy.

Turning to AGM procedural matters, there were updates on action taken following key motions from the previous year about our commitment to reducing loneliness and to cut the use of single-use plastics within the organisation. The Annual Report and Financial Statements 2017/18 – showing a more heartening end-of-year position than of late – and the re-appointment of BTP Associates as our auditors were unanimously supported. Then, as a first, the meeting received written feedback from our representatives on the Courts at the universities of Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff and Swansea.

Reports from Chief Executive Kathryn Robson and Chair John Graystone emphasised longer-term trends in adult education and in our unique contribution, while also paying attention to the year’s highlights. These included improved success rates among our learners, an Estyn inspection of a couple of months previously, and the sad inevitability of putting the Harlech campus on sale.

Finally, the 3 resolutions submitted by members were debated. That asking for redoubled commitment to ‘an educated democracy’ in line with Raymond Williams’s philosophy was approved as amended; also approved was one seeking more provision of education for older people in society, as was the last one calling for adequate personal support for learners, enabling them to learn at their own pace.

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